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A collection of thoughts from Jess Ashby
insightsimagesideas:

INSIGHT.
So true and it’s a real shame. 

insightsimagesideas:

INSIGHT.

So true and it’s a real shame. 

(Source: grappblr)

2 years ago
54,196 notes | Comment
fastcompany:

3-D Printing And Pirate Bay Usher In the Era of Pirated Physical Goods with “Physibles.”

“the idea of encoding an industrial design as a pirate-able torrent does open up intriguing variations on traditional copyright infringement and corporate espionage.”

Read on->

A new era of physical copyright infringement?

fastcompany:

3-D Printing And Pirate Bay Usher In the Era of Pirated Physical Goods with “Physibles.”

“the idea of encoding an industrial design as a pirate-able torrent does open up intriguing variations on traditional copyright infringement and corporate espionage.”

Read on->

A new era of physical copyright infringement?

2 years ago
43 notes | Comment
THE TELEGRAPH: Owners of the Costa Concordia offer shipwreck survivors 30% discount on future cruises. No really.
You should have explained beforehand that I would have to pay.
He said, explaining that he thought the contract he signed was a joke.  (via clientsfromhell)
2 years ago
304 notes | Comment

Oh yes, this happens in the real world!

clientsfromhell:

Client: I need you to reformat this so that it matches our new marketing and logo redesign.

Me: Okay. Can you send the new logo and some samples of your new marketing?

Client: Oh, we’re still deciding on that internally. Can’t you just take a few guesses in the meantime?

2 years ago
129 notes | Comment
life:

In 1965, LIFE photographer Bill Ray spent three weeks riding with the Hells Angels in California. Here, two women — the Angels’ “old ladies” — hang out at a bar while the Angels attend a meeting.

“This picture feels almost religious to me: The women are drawn to the hot glow of the jukebox god, one bowing her head while the other kneels before it. Bill Ray’s perfect blacks, whites, and greys add to the sense of an upside-down spirituality.” — LIFE’s Editor-in-Chief Bill Shapiro 

After looking through thousands of images these past few years, we’ll put it this way: choosing our favorite photographs was not an easy task.

life:

In 1965, LIFE photographer Bill Ray spent three weeks riding with the Hells Angels in California. Here, two women — the Angels’ “old ladies” — hang out at a bar while the Angels attend a meeting.

“This picture feels almost religious to me: The women are drawn to the hot glow of the jukebox god, one bowing her head while the other kneels before it. Bill Ray’s perfect blacks, whites, and greys add to the sense of an upside-down spirituality.” — LIFE’s Editor-in-Chief Bill Shapiro

After looking through thousands of images these past few years, we’ll put it this way: choosing our favorite photographs was not an easy task.

2 years ago
590 notes | View comments
futurejournalismproject:

 
Meet Deep Dive, the New York Times’ experimental context engine and story explorer

Using an article as a jumping-off point, Deep Dive can create a custom, contextual feed that will allow readers to follow topics in the news.
Deep Dive uses the Times’ massive cache of metadata from stories to go, as the name suggests, deeper into a news event by pulling together related articles. So instead of performing a search yourself within the Times and weeding out off-topic results, Deep Dive would provides readers a collection of stories relating to a topic, based on whatever person, place, event or topic of their choosing. So let’s say you’re interested in protests in Yemen, with Deep Dive you could use an article from nytimes.com as a seed and let the system collect a history of previous items relating to news from the region.

Really interesting tool.  When I was in Studio 20, we examined “explainer journalism” in detail. A huge part of an explainer is being able to find the history of the story easily so that you can bring yourself up to date on the issue in the new article.
continue reading at Nieman Journalism Lab

futurejournalismproject:

Meet Deep Dive, the New York Times’ experimental context engine and story explorer

Using an article as a jumping-off point, Deep Dive can create a custom, contextual feed that will allow readers to follow topics in the news.

Deep Dive uses the Times’ massive cache of metadata from stories to go, as the name suggests, deeper into a news event by pulling together related articles. So instead of performing a search yourself within the Times and weeding out off-topic results, Deep Dive would provides readers a collection of stories relating to a topic, based on whatever person, place, event or topic of their choosing. So let’s say you’re interested in protests in Yemen, with Deep Dive you could use an article from nytimes.com as a seed and let the system collect a history of previous items relating to news from the region.

Really interesting tool.  When I was in Studio 20, we examined “explainer journalism” in detail. A huge part of an explainer is being able to find the history of the story easily so that you can bring yourself up to date on the issue in the new article.

continue reading at Nieman Journalism Lab

(via newsweek)

2 years ago
85 notes | View comments

Mad World - Gary Jules/Tears for Fears Cover (by sallyannfowler)

2 years ago
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bigblackbootslongbrownhair:



I made millions studying the math of mortgages and bonds and helping bankers pass the Chartered Financial Analyst Exam.
It isn’t fair that I have retired in comfort after a career working with financial instruments while people who worked as nurses, teachers, soldiers, etc are worried about paying for their future, their healthcare, and their children’s educations.
They are the backbone of this country that allowed me to succeed.
I am willing to pay more taxes so that everyone can look forward to a secure future like I do.
I am the 1%
I stand with the 99%
(Which equals 100% of America)
Tax me.


You sir, are awesome.

bigblackbootslongbrownhair:

I made millions studying the math of mortgages and bonds and helping bankers pass the Chartered Financial Analyst Exam.

It isn’t fair that I have retired in comfort after a career working with financial instruments while people who worked as nurses, teachers, soldiers, etc are worried about paying for their future, their healthcare, and their children’s educations.

They are the backbone of this country that allowed me to succeed.

I am willing to pay more taxes so that everyone can look forward to a secure future like I do.

I am the 1%

I stand with the 99%

(Which equals 100% of America)

Tax me.

You sir, are awesome.

(Source: badddandi)

2 years ago
1,305 notes | View comments